Blundell’s Cottage, Canberra

Blundell’s Cottage is a bit of an anomaly in Canberra. Perched on the edge of Lake Burley-Griffin is an old stone cottage with a traditional slab hut right next to it. There are very few really old buildings in Canberra, and this one pre-dates the lake by about 100 years.

Blundell's Cottage

Blundell’s Cottage [Olympus PEN E-P5 ISO100 f/22 1/5 sec 14mm]

Blundell’s cottage was built in around 1858 for the ploughman for George P Campbell – the local land-owner whose name graces the suburb roughly covering where his farm ‘Duntroon’ once stood. When it was built, it was on the edge of the Molonglo River floodplain, and Canberra was not yet even a dream. Ginn was followed into the cottage by the Blundells – also employees of Campbell, and they lived in it from 1874-1933.  So they were still living it – even after the Commonwealth of Australia acquired the Duntroon Estate owned by Campbell in 1913. The Duntroon name lives on in the Officer training school nearby.

Blundell's Cottage

Blundell’s Cottage [Olympus E-P5 ISO100 f/22 1/5sec 14mm]

Today it is a museum, carefully preserved as an example of a late 19th century workers cottage. It is open every Saturday from 10.00am-2.00pm, and it rests just metres from the waters edge of the lake overlooking Parliament House just across the water.

Blundell's Cottage

Blundell’s Cottage [Olympus E-P5 ISO100 f/22 1/6 sec 14mm]

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Playing in fog

Rowers in fog

Rowers in fog

The coach was having a hard time keeping the trainees in sight [Olympus E-P5
42mm 1/40 Sec f/18 ISO1000]

Trees in fog

Trees in fog

At the edge of Lake Burley-Griffin in Canberra, these trees had a delicate lacy feel to them – and I loved the cool-warm contrast as the mist started to thin beneath the sun, foreshadowing a beautiful clear day ahead. [Olympus E-P5 14mm 1/40 Sec f/22 ISO1000]

Trees in fog over water

Trees in fog over water

The trees gently framed the lake and in through the mist you could just make out the next spur of land projecting into the water. [Olympus E-P5 14mm 1/40 Sec f/22 ISO1000] All shots were tripod mounted (using a lightweight carbon fibre tripod by Sirui and remotely triggered.

Mornings like this are special as they make everything that bit mysterious – but you have to be early as once the sun comes up higher the mist evaporates pretty quickly – by 10.00AM it is gone revealing a clear day. But mornings like this I make sure I keep a camera handy in the car, because it only takes a moment to pull over into a parking bay and walk down to the lake edge for a few shots before heading off to the office or into town for some shopping.